“Narrating Information Technology in the Twenty-First Century”

Welcome to the course weblog for Narrative and Technology. This is a space for us to collectively construct, a site of further exploration and discussion, a place to pursue avenues outside of the purview of the physical classroom. So, in addition to posting your responses to the reading (see Blog Assignment sheet and individual assignments), I would like to see us using this blog as a tool for creative critical thinking, for actively making this into an additional resource for everyone involved.

As I’m sure many of you are aware, any number of things can make for interesting blogging. Here are a few suggestions I have quite liberally lifted from media studies scholar Kathleen Fitzpatrick (who got it from Meg Worley), with some of my own emendations:

  • Isn’t it interesting the way that passage X seems to predict contemporary phenomenon Y?
  • Wow, check out this unexpected relationship I found between text B and C.
  • I found this cool article online that you should all read!
  • I did a little research on author D, and doesn’t information E change the way we read F?
  • Does “jargon-term” mean P or Q, or something else entirely?
  • Whoa, Reading Z really reminds me of L.
  • I could use some feedback on this idea I’ve been wrestling with.
  • Did he say A or B in class yesterday? I forgot to write it down.
  • Hey, I’m in a play this weekend, and y’all should come!

Of course this is a by no means complete list, as the amount of things to find, comment upon, share, and post is exhaustive. I am eager, however, to see what you do find and what we make of it together here. Happy blogging!

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About Bradley J. Fest

Bradley J. Fest is assistant professor of English at Hartwick College. He is the author of two books of poetry, The Rocking Chair (Blue Sketch, 2015) and The Shape of Things (Salò, 2017), and has published a number of essays on contemporary literature and culture. He blogs at The Hyperarchival Parallax.
This entry was posted in General Interest, History, Information Technology, Narrative, Reading Response, Technology, Videogames and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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